TPG Architecture Gives Newsday A New Space Reflective Of Its Brand

TPG Architecture’s design for Newsday has a technology-infused, modern feel that gives the workplace a fresh and forward-thinking atmosphere.

For Newsday’s new Melville home, New York City-based architecture and design firm TPG Architecture was tasked with full design, strategy, and change management services for this relocation projects. Throughout the design process, TPG needed to preserve Newsday’s strong legacy as it moves forward into the future. Newsday reenergized itself as an award-winning multimedia company through the conception of a safe and welcoming space that is dynamic, reflective of its brand, and serves as a source of inspiration for both visitors and staff. This headquarters relocation also allowed Newsday to consolidate and bring their staff together under one roof. Additionally, employee care was paramount— Newsday wanted their team to feel that they were moving into a comfortable work environment that suits their needs today and well into the future. The design has a strong technology-infused, modern feel that gives the workplace a fresh and forward-thinking atmosphere.

The TPG Architecture Branding and Graphics Studio played an essential role in Newsday’s design. Throughout the process, it was important that the new office reflected the Long Island aesthetic and drew inspiration from the local community. The team designed a large-scale art installation that features published Newsday photos printed on metal panels outside the main entrance. The photos were taken on Long Island and either used in print or digitally. The panels cascade up the walls and onto the ceiling, giving off a strong sense of movement and motion. Additionally, next to the entrance, the Newsday logo shines proudly, and inside the main reception is a large media wall. Behind it is a printed map of Long Island—further driving home the publication’s strong tie to the community. On the other side of the office within the employee entrance, there is another photo wall that can easily be changed and edited. Here, staff can highlight the latest photography, feature articles, or other relevant work they want to share companywide.

Within the newsroom, there is a flash cam area for quick camera pans to reporters during live broadcasts and streams—positioned right in the middle of the news hub, allowing staff members to feel like they are a part of the action. The work area is open, surrounded by large-scale TV screens to monitor the latest news developments and work. Several portal features along the walls and ceilings help break up space within the main hub and provide further dimension. They also now have photo and video editing studios, used to further increase their digital and social media presence. The large café is placed towards the center of the plan, and adjacent to the other entrance and surrounding it are lots of meeting and collaboration rooms that make this a bustling point of convergence in the office. Within the workstation areas, employees sit in bench seating with access to lots of natural daylight. Since the floor plates are large, the design team included collaboration pavilions to help employees orient themselves around the office. These open collaboration zones are usually situated near the window and offer a mix of open and closed spaces, lounge seating, and small huddle rooms.

The interactive multimedia space at Newsday’s new Melville headquarters is geared towards celebrating local community events such as high school scholar athlete award ceremonies, Long Island business leader awards, and other similar events. Inside the interactive multimedia space, guests see the signature Newsday blue against the back wall and a stage made of soft oak planks, featuring a large screen for presentations. The side walls are made of a textured wrap panel with integrated TV screens to amplify their tech-driven design. Newsday plans to rent out this space to outside groups, which can accommodate up to 186 people.

When was the project completed? 

June 2021

How many SF per person?

161 SF / person

Describe the work space type.

Open floor plan.

What kind of meeting spaces are provided?

Since the floor plates are large, the design team included collaboration pavilions to help employees orient themselves around the office. These open collaboration zones are usually situated near the window and offer a mix of open and closed spaces, lounge seating, and small huddle rooms.

What other kinds of support or amenity spaces are provided?

Large café, multimedia interactive space, and collaboration pavilions.

What is the projects location?

6 Corporate Center Drive, Melville, NY 11747.

How is the space changing/adapting as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic?

The space/design did not alter due to COVID-19. The space was executed with a post-pandemic world in mind.

Any other information or project metrics?

Open vs. Closed ratio is 97:3

What kind of programming or visioning activities were used to create the space?

In the initial stages of the project, the TPG Strategy Studio led frequent ambassador meetings with over 25 department representatives at Newsday. Through these interactive sessions, surveys, mock-ups, and events we uncovered the desire for the new office to keep up and be aligned to the Newsday mission. The new environment needed to reflect the proud, creative, fast-paced nature of the company while keeping true to its positioning as the anchor to Long Island.

Were any change management initiatives employed?

Yes – Newsday did enlist the TPG Strategy Studio for Change Management Services. This included written announcements, employee checklist, and other to-do items in preparation for the move.

Was there any emphasis or requirements on programming for health and wellbeing initiatives for employees?

Employee care was paramount— Newsday wanted their team to feel that they were moving into a comfortable work environment that suits their needs today and in the future. Access to daylight and views became a driver for the design concept.

What products or service solutions are making the biggest impact in your space?

Newsroom/ broadcast studio, editing studios, and interactive multimedia/event space.

What kind of branding elements were incorporated into the design?

Throughout the design process, it was important that the new office reflected the Long Island aesthetic and drew inspiration from the local community. The team designed a large-scale art installation that features published Newsday photos printed on metal panels outside the main entrance. The photos were taken on Long Island and either used in print or digitally. The panels cascade up the walls and onto the ceiling, giving off a strong sense of movement and motion.

Next to the entrance, the Newsday logo shines brightly and inside the main reception is a large media wall. Behind it is a printed map of Long Island—further driving home the publication’s strong tie to the community. On the other side of the office, there is another photo wall in the employee entrance that can easily be changed and edited. Staff can highlight the latest photography, feature articles, or other relevant work they want to share companywide.

What is the most unique feature of the space?

The most unique feature of the space is the interactive multimedia space. This feature is geared towards celebrating local community events such as high school scholar athlete award ceremonies, Long Island business leader awards, and other similar events. Newsday plans to rent out this space to outside groups, which can accommodate up to 186 people.

Are there any furnishings or spaces specifically included to promote wellness/wellbeing?

Within the workstation areas, employees sit in bench seating with access to lots of natural daylight.

What kinds of technology products were used?

The design has a strong technology-infused, modern feel that gives the workplace a fresh and forward-thinking atmosphere. The newsroom and broadcast studio space is the beating heart of the office. Positioned within the open plan, it’s equipped with 4K/HD technology, large-scale monitors, a virtual set, and a “flash cam” for quick pans. The work area is open, surrounded by large-scale TV screens to monitor the latest news developments and work. They also now have photo and video editing  studios that can increase their digital and social media presence.

Who else contributed significantly to this project?

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